What Does the Zombie Genre Really Say About Us?

“Usually disasters like this bring out the best in everybody, and that’s what we expected to see. Now we’ve got people that it’s bringing out the worst in.” This is a quote from the Governor of Louisiana Kathleen Blanco in 2005 during the after effects in Hurricane Katrina as presented in When the Levees Broke. I was brought back to this moment and this concept while talking about zombie narratives in class on Friday, and while I was reading Zone One.

In reading the rather convoluted text Zone One, something that grounded and grounds me is the zombie genre and how familiar it is to me. This was true for a lot of people in the class like Spencer and Jenna, for example. I have experienced the “zombie disaster” genre through many mediums–video games, television shows, movies–but approaching Zone One, I became aware of how similar this–hopefully–fantasy genre is to the course concepts and materials we have covered.

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What Do You Do at a Traffic Light?: A Response to “The Conundrum of Color-Blindness” and Self-Proclaimed Racially Colorblind Individuals

After reading Spencer’s blog post, “The Conundrum of Color-Blindness,” and after Beth mentioned the idea of “colorblindness” a couple of classes ago, I was intrigued to go into the topic further. This is especially true when I considered the words of Roach in relation to how Spencer ends his post.

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The Power of Art as Experienced in When The Levees Broke

I mulled over my thoughts on When the Levees Broke during spring break, and my conclusion was that the film as a whole was incredibly dense, both in factual and emotive value. Since the film was informative, I was able to know more about the timeline of the events during Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans and more about the reactions and stories of individuals. The film evoked real feelings from me, as I’m sure it did for everyone who watched the documentary.

Beth’s words ring true when she said, “when you were moved by Levees it was done as a work of art.” Through our reaction from When the Levees Broke, I think it’s really important to consider the effects that are created from art. This is especially important as well considering our current political climate and how art is the salvation we need to cope with current events.

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Cultural Remembering and Forgetting: A Response to the “Tot Tanic” Bouncy Castle

“There are certain topics that are off-limits to comedians: JFK, AIDS, the Holocaust. The Lincoln Assassination just recently became funny. ‘I need to see this play like I need a hole in the head.’ And I hope to someday live in a world where a person could tell a hilarious AIDS joke. It’s one of my dreams.” -Michael Scott, “The Office”

This quote from one of my favorite television shows popped into my head during today’s discussion on memory versus forgetting. Michael’s reference to not being able to make jokes about “JFK, AIDS, and the Holocaust” relates to the immense tragedies involving the topics, but also to the timeliness of the issues. Compared to those three things, the Lincoln Assassination occurred very long ago. The problem with timeliness of the commercialization of or jokes about topics from history is apparent in this quote, as well as in our discussion of the “Tot Tanic” image Beth showed us in class.

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